Manus & Associates, Palo Alto, CA

I very much enjoyed The Building. In fact, it gets more interesting in many ways than either Gogol or Kharms. You have a very distinct-and Russian-style…
Christian Cummings
Manus & Associates, Palo Alto, CA

Vigliano Associates, New York

…I found the premise unique, and the writing (for the most part) rich and engaging. I also noted in your voice and characters a distinct existentialist quality – whether intentional or not, a bit reminiscent of 20th-century Russian literature in general, and Dostoyevsky's novels in particular.
Jason Sholl
Vigliano Associates, New York

Knizhnaya Vitrina (Book Review), Russia

…Having read the 300-page novel in one sitting, I fell into a stupor, as if I'd just finished watching something along the lines of Kubrick's The Shining. After awhile, associations began to suggest themselves: Kafka's The Castle and the steel-carcass labyrinth of Robbe-Grillet's novels, but without their existential overload, abbreviated to a slick thriller in the tradition of Roman Polanski and David Fincher. …Undoubtfully "The Building" is a genre literature, a superb horror novel. Yet if you abstract for a moment from the gripping plot, you reach another dimension and - strange as it may be - you no longer realize the genre limits and return into the reality of Kafka and Robbe-Grillet. Or rather into a very similar reality, but still different one - as if it existed on the same floor in one building. Downstairs Gustav Meirink, Leo Peruc and Edgar Poe live. And William Berrows occupies the basement.
Knizhnaya Vitrina (Book Review), Russia

Litopia Corporation Ltd, London, UK

…This is a great idea, nicely executed. I'm interested.
Peter Cox
Litopia Corporation Ltd, London, UK

Novoye Russkoye Slovo & Russian TV Guide, New York

…I swallowed The Building in a single day, unable to put it down. And it wasn't just a matter of a tightly-woven plot… In an intriguing and dynamic style, The official site for author Vladimir Grjonko (Grzhonko) has latest news, novels, short stories, a number of essays, etc.'s novel touches upon philosophical issues that many would otherwise find dull and irrelevant-the issues of Time, God, the Labyrinth, and the frailty of human existence.